Research Talks

All members of Darwin are encouraged to present their research at informal seminars held on Tuesdays and Thursdays during term. Everyone is welcome, whatever your degree or discipline.

Darwin members pick up lunch from 12:00, taking it into the Richard King Room (on the left at the top of the stairs leading to the dining hall) or 1 Newnham Terrace (straight through at the far end of the dining hall). Wine is served. Non-Darwin members are welcome to attend, although lunch is only available to guests of members. The talk begins at about 1:15 and lasts for about 20 minutes and is followed by questions over coffee. We adjourn at 2:00pm at the latest.

Upcoming Talks

Darwin Lunchtime Talks will recommence next term and the schedule posted here.

Past Research Talks

Tuesday 30 June 2020
Mayumi Sato

This research examines how digital technologies in decarceration and anti-prison-industrial complex (PIC) movements reimagine and formulate new sites of anti-racist praxis in the Global North. Through participatory action research in four settler-colonial states (U.S., Canada, New Zealand, and Australia), this study looks at how counter-narratives contesting the PIC in the digital sphere from indigenous, prison justice activists, and formerly incarcerated peoples’ epistemologies can be examined as everyday sites of resistance. By examining the channels through which they organize, locally and transnationally, this research discusses how anti-PIC resistance in the digital age can help subvert and rethink the separation between those inside prisons and those in the “free-world”.

Tuesday 30 June 2020
Mayumi Sato

This research examines how digital technologies in decarceration and anti-prison-industrial complex (PIC) movements reimagine and formulate new sites of anti-racist praxis in the Global North. Through participatory action research in four settler-colonial states (U.S., Canada, New Zealand, and Australia), this study looks at how counter-narratives contesting the PIC in the digital sphere from indigenous, prison justice activists, and formerly incarcerated peoples’ epistemologies can be examined as everyday sites of resistance. By examining the channels through which they organize, locally and transnationally, this research discusses how anti-PIC resistance in the digital age can help subvert and rethink the separation between those inside prisons and those in the “free-world”.

Thursday 25 June 2020
Ezra Hampikian

Abstract not available

Tuesday 23 June 2020
Dr Nebojša Radić, Chair of the SAH Online Teaching Working Group, Director of CULP

Abstract not available

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